Rear shock oil
  • sbronco68
    Posts: 323
    Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2007 5:13 pm

    Rear shock oil

    by sbronco68 » Mon Sep 24, 2007 8:07 pm

    Ok guys so I know nothing about suspension so I though I would learn by rebuilding my front and back shocks. The fronts went well and the rear seamed very easy also. Though my biggest problem came in figuring out what oil to put back in and here is where my question comes in. My bike now bounces after a semi hard landing at the track off a jump. Now I know I may need to adjust my rebound but it never use to do that with the same settings. The guy at the local shop said this oil would work for both front and back did he lie?

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    05 450R
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    124
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    by 124 » Tue Sep 25, 2007 5:29 am

    Did you recharge the Nitrogen (N)? Did you make sure that ALL the air is removed from around the bladder?
    70' Honda CT70 (Trail 70; Gold)
    16' KX450
    16' KX85
    12' YZ125
  • sbronco68
    Posts: 323
    Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2007 5:13 pm

    by sbronco68 » Tue Sep 25, 2007 8:37 am

    124 wrote:Did you recharge the Nitrogen (N)? Did you make sure that ALL the air is removed from around the bladder?


    I sure think I got all the air out. I over filled the reservoir and when i put the bladder in the oil over flowed. I then had it charged with 160psi of Nitrogen. Then agin when I was bench testing it I think i mite have heard some air going through the valving. Could this be my problem?
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    AgentSmith
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    by AgentSmith » Tue Sep 25, 2007 8:44 am

    Yup, it will make it much more harsh.

    Try this procedure to evacuate air without collapsing the bladder.

    "-Place your assembled rod into the tube and run it through the travel until you have a
    minimum amount of air in the circuits and valving. When bleeding don’t
    pull too quickly on return as you will create a vacuum behind the piston. Also keep the
    fluid level up in the body tube to prevent the rebound ports to go above the fluid level.
    -Once the shock piston has been bled, place the rod near the top of the shock. Add fluid
    and release the air simutaionsouly. Keep the fluid above the rebound ports, and continue
    releasing air until you have no charge on the shock bladder. Pull the rod back up to the
    highest point possible without going above the oil line. Top off with fluid and install the
    seal head. Release pressure on the bladder as it fills the body with excess oil.
    -Install the circlip and bottom out plate. Make sure the plate removal holes are 90 from
    center so to make them easy to access when servicing shock again. Install using a soft
    mallet. (We recommend a plastic mallet..)
    -Charge the shock with 120PSI of clean air.
    -Place the shock up right with the lower mount in you vise. Run the shock through full
    travel 4-5 times. Check for feel, and inspect all seals for leaks.


    Final bleed
    -Make sure the rod is fully extended.
    -Place the compression adjuster in the highest position.
    -Reduce bladder pressure to zero. (If you want it’s best to remove core.. or you can
    simply hold valve in during bleed, to allow atmospheric pressure to expand bladder to
    full size.)
    -Loosen the adjuster (just loose enough to let the fluid flow out)and let all extra fluid to run out.

    At this point I inflate the bladder with no more than a couple pounds of pressure to ensure the bladder is fully inflated.

    Then tighten the compression adjuster BEFORE you let the pressure out of the bladder.
    -Reinstall Schrader core.
    -Charge shock with nitrogen.
    -Inspect for any leaks.
    -Install spring and set preload.
    -Set clickers"
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  • sbronco68
    Posts: 323
    Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2007 5:13 pm

    by sbronco68 » Tue Sep 25, 2007 9:40 am

    ~ wrote:Yup, it will make it much more harsh.

    Try this procedure to evacuate air without collapsing the bladder.

    "-Place your assembled rod into the tube and run it through the travel until you have a
    minimum amount of air in the circuits and valving. When bleeding don’t
    pull too quickly on return as you will create a vacuum behind the piston. Also keep the
    fluid level up in the body tube to prevent the rebound ports to go above the fluid level.
    -Once the shock piston has been bled, place the rod near the top of the shock. Add fluid
    and release the air simutaionsouly. Keep the fluid above the rebound ports, and continue
    releasing air until you have no charge on the shock bladder. Pull the rod back up to the
    highest point possible without going above the oil line. Top off with fluid and install the
    seal head. Release pressure on the bladder as it fills the body with excess oil.
    -Install the circlip and bottom out plate. Make sure the plate removal holes are 90 from
    center so to make them easy to access when servicing shock again. Install using a soft
    mallet. (We recommend a plastic mallet..)
    -Charge the shock with 120PSI of clean air.
    -Place the shock up right with the lower mount in you vise. Run the shock through full
    travel 4-5 times. Check for feel, and inspect all seals for leaks.


    Final bleed
    -Make sure the rod is fully extended.
    -Place the compression adjuster in the highest position.
    -Reduce bladder pressure to zero. (If you want it’s best to remove core.. or you can
    simply hold valve in during bleed, to allow atmospheric pressure to expand bladder to
    full size.)
    -Loosen the adjuster (just loose enough to let the fluid flow out)and let all extra fluid to run out.

    At this point I inflate the bladder with no more than a couple pounds of pressure to ensure the bladder is fully inflated.

    Then tighten the compression adjuster BEFORE you let the pressure out of the bladder.
    -Reinstall Schrader core.
    -Charge shock with nitrogen.
    -Inspect for any leaks.
    -Install spring and set preload.
    -Set clickers"


    Wow Agent thanks I will give that a try. A few questions though:

    1. When I install the seal head how does that not trap some air in?
    2. What about the air (if their is air) in the reservoir side? How is that getting out?
    3. What oil should I use? THe stuff I got was $20 a quart anything cheaper?
    4. ANyone know of a cheep place to get the Nitrogen charged up around Orange County? I payed $15 last time for that I should just go buy my own bottle of N.

    Sorry for all the questions :roll: :roll: :roll:
    05 450R
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  • hondacrf0585kx125
    Posts: 6
    Joined: Sun Feb 22, 2009 7:10 pm

    by hondacrf0585kx125 » Sun Feb 22, 2009 8:04 pm

    If you look at your seal head their are two small holes in the bottom. These alow the air to pass out from underneath the sealhead untill they are covered by the shock body. So, it is important to push the seal head in slowly while realing any charge in the blader. I do mine the exact same as he described, but when I finall blead I put 4 psi in the blader before I turn the comp. adj. out. This will not only ensure that any trapped air will be released, but also ensure the shock is not over filled with oil. I like to use Kayaba sso1 2.5wt. in my shock.
  • sbronco68
    Posts: 323
    Joined: Sun Apr 01, 2007 5:13 pm

    by sbronco68 » Sun Feb 22, 2009 8:10 pm

    Very cool, I had no idea about the holes in the seal to let the air out. THANKS
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